Volume 4 Supplement 1

15th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics (ICEE XV)

Open Access

Assessing the thermal-moisture functional performance of two sets of work uniform by S-smart simulation

  • Wenfang Song1,
  • Albert PC Chan2,
  • Yueping Guo2,
  • Yang Yang2 and
  • Faming Wang1Email author
Extreme Physiology & Medicine20154(Suppl 1):A90

DOI: 10.1186/2046-7648-4-S1-A90

Published: 14 September 2015

Introduction

Construction workers are susceptible to heat stress in summer of Hong Kong. Wearing work uniform with good thermal-moisture functional performance (TMFP) is considered as one of the effective measures to protect workers from heat stress. However, there is a lack of scientific research to design workers' uniform based on heat-moisture engineering. This study aims to predict the TMFP of the selected fabrics by a S-smart system [1] under a stressful thermal environment.

Methods

The fabric characteristics of the examined knitted T-shirts (T1 and T2) and woven full-length pants (P1 and P2) were listed in Table 1. The S-smart system was adopted to simulate TMFP of clothing with the input parameters listed in Table 1 (fabric characteristics) and Table 2 (body characteristics, activities and environmental condition) [2]. The simulation results were the human physiological responses, including the mean skin temperature (Tsk) and core temperature (Tc).
Table 1

Fabric characteristics T-shirt fabrics (T1 and T2) and full-length pants (P1 and P2).

Fabrics

Fabric content

Weight (g.m-2)

Thickness (mm)

OMMC

AR (KPa.s.m-1)

WVP (g.m-2.h-1)

k (w.m-1oC-1)

T1

100% cotton

134.37

0.55

0.66

0.24

657.8

0.06

T2

100% Coolmax®

146.40

0.62

0.8

0.06

593.1

0.06

P1

60% cotton blended with 40% polyester

174.95

0.35

0.69

1.58

496

0.05

P2

100% cotton with Dry-Inside® technology

185.26

0.48

0.86

1.96

530.6

0.06

Note: OMMC-overall moisture management capacity; AR-air resistance; WVP-Water vapour permeability; k-heat conductivity

Table 2

The design case in computer: body characteristics, activities and environmental condition.

 

The design case in computer simulation

Body characteristics

65.6 kg and 168.5 cm

Activity and environmental condition

Seated relaxed (58 w.m-2), and (30°C, 50 %RH)-Standing activity (163 w.m-2), and (30.7°C, 65 %RH)- Standing activity (248 w.m-2), and (33°C, 54 %RH)-moving activity (229 w.m-2), and (34°C, 42 %RH)-moving activity (167 w/m2), and (32°C, 41 %RH)-recovery (58 w.m-2), and (31°C, 44 %RH)

Results and discussion

The computer simulation in Figure 1 showed that T2 and P2 had better thermal-moisture performance in terms of predicted core and skin temperatures than T1 and P1, respectively. However, only a marginal difference was presented. This is might due to the excellent OMMC and lower AR of T2 and P2 compared to T1 and P1, promoting evaporative heat loss more efficiently.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F2046-7648-4-S1-A90/MediaObjects/13728_2015_Article_159_Fig1_HTML.jpg
Figure 1

Comparison of core and skin and core temperature changes among T-shirts (T1 and T2) and pants (P1 and P2).

Conclusion

The computer simulation results indicated that T2 and P2 can improve thermoregulation by decreasing the predicted core and skin temperatures and microclimate humidity as compared to T1 and P1, respectively.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Laboratory for Clothing Physiology and Ergonomics (LCPE), the National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, Soochow University
(2)
Department of Building and Real Estate, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

References

  1. Guo YP, et al: Heat and mass transfer of adult incontinence briefs in computational simulations and objective measurements. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. 2013, 64: 133-144.View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  2. Chan APC, et al: Evaluating a newly designed construction work uniform on heat stress. Textile Research Journal. 2015, unpublished paperGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Song et al.; 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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